Most folks in Idaho are waiting for the change in the U.S. federal administration – for they certainly don’t like the way things are going now, a new Idaho Politics Weekly poll shows.

It’s no secret most Idahoans don’t think much of President Barack Obama, of which he is aware – he didn’t visit Idaho during his eight years in office until this summer.

Pollster Dan Jones & Associates finds that 71 percent of Idahoans believe the country is going in the wrong direction.

Only 21 percent say the U.S. is headed in the right direction, and 8 percent didn’t know.

On the state front, 47 percent say Idaho is going in the right direction, 40 percent say the wrong direction, and 13 percent don’t know.

Asked if they are better off today than they were four years ago, 52 percent say “much” or “somewhat” better off, 38 percent say “much” or “somewhat” worse off, and 10 percent don’t know.

Asking if one thinks his country, state or city in going in the right or wrong direction is a standard polling measurement on the basic political attitude of the populace, says Jones.

That’s not a very good indication (the 47 percent “right”) for the GOP leaders of Idaho. The governor and majority party in the Legislature would like to be above 50 percent in the “right” direction column.

Still, the Republican state bosses can feel good about their own party members’ opinions: 60 percent of Republicans said Idaho is going in the right direction, 27 percent said the wrong direction, and 13 percent didn’t know.

Democrats, to no one’s surprise, feel the opposite: 61 percent said the state is going in the wrong direction, 31 percent said right direction, and 8 percent didn’t know.

Political independents are split: 41 percent said right direction, 44 percent said wrong direction and 16 percent didn’t know.

You have to love the enthusiasm of youth.

Jones found that 76 percent of those 18-29 years old said they are better off today than they were four years ago.

Of course, for an 18-year-old, four years ago he would have been 14, maybe with acne, no girlfriend and couldn’t drive.

Now he’s got some wheels, a gal on his arm and hopefully his skin has cleared up. Life’s pretty good.

For his mom and dad, no so much.

Jones finds that among those who are 50-59, only 36 percent said they are better off today than they were four years ago, 54 percent said they are worse off, and 9 percent didn’t know.

For Idaho Republicans: 51 percent said they are better off today than four years ago, 37 percent said worse off, and 13 percent didn’t know.

Democrats: 63 percent better off, 32 percent worse off and 5 percent didn’t know.

Political independents: 50 percent better off, 38 percent worse off, 11 percent didn’t know.

Jones polled 595 adults from Oct. 28 to Nov. 4; with a margin of error of plus or minus 4.02 percent.