State Treasurer Provides ‘Mini Vaults’ for students. On Oct. 22, Boundary County was visited by the State Treasurer Julie Ellsworth. She presented almost 200 mini-vaults to the students and explained the importance of saving for the future.

“You are the first ones to see and receive these mini vaults,” Ellsworth told the fourth- and fifth-grade classes she visited.

Along with the vault they also received a Certificate of Vault Registration, and she congratulated the students for becoming part of Idaho’s history.

Ellsworth told students that Boundary County is a long way from Boise and this is why she wanted them to be the first, but if they are in Boise they need to stop by her office and she will show them the real vault.

The vault has been in the same location since the first phase of the construction of Idaho’s Capitol Building, Ellsworth said, noting that the Capitol was actually built around the vault. The Capitol was finished in 1912.

Being a teacher prior to becoming the state treasurer, Ellsworth had the ability and grace to answer all questions from the students — from where Idaho invests funds and if the cash was in the vault, to why she was wearing boots.

Ellsworth also shared information on Idaho’s unclaimed property and suggested that Boundary County business and residents have more than $420,000 in unclaimed property — a website to search would be: yourmoney.idaho.gov.

Judge To Make Decision on Complaint Against Treasurer. Speaker of the House Scott Bedke and other state leaders made their case in court recently, arguing that a lawsuit against the State Treasurer should move forward.

“The Treasurer would rather try this in the court of public opinion,” said Speaker of the House Scott Bedke. “But, this is a pure question of law, and we are looking for the appropriate legal remedy.”

Speaker of the House Scott Bedke and President Pro Tem Brent Hill reluctantly filed the complaint in June after the treasurer refused to follow state law. That 2007 law allows the Legislature to decide what is done with the first, third, and fourth floors of the building. The treasurer’s office is located on the first floor.

“Some commentators say it is ridiculous to have a lawsuit over office space. We agree,” said Bedke. “But, when an elected official refuses to follow state law, there is something much larger at stake. Perhaps the Treasurer will listen to the court when it declares that she is bound by the law, which we fully expect to happen.”

The Legislature has offered to allow the Treasurer to stay in her suite with some of her staff. She has refused, even though she (like most other Constitutional Officers in Idaho) already has staff in many other locations.

Idaho to help fight California wildfires. Gov. Brad Little has approved an Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC) agreement with California to assist with recovery efforts following wildfires.  

“Idaho has an amazing depth of emergency management professionals that are willing to step up and help our fellow Americans during their times of need,” Little said. “Their skills and expertise will be an asset as we work with Californians in the disaster response.”

The teams being deployed are from Emmett Fire Department, Parma Fire Department, Sand Hollow Fire Department, and Weiser Rural Fire Department, and include 5 engines and 17 personnel.  

“Participation in the EMAC is vital to retaining a strong network of emergency management professionals and resources across the nation,” Idaho Office of Emergency Management Director Brad Richy said. “Idaho has helped with many calls for EMAC support in the past and we are proud to continue to do so in the future.”

The deployment of state, county, and municipal government employees from Idaho is made possible through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC), a mutual aid agreement between states, created to provide assistance in the event of a disaster. More information is available at https://www.emacweb.org/

The deployment for the teams is expected to last 17 days. Under the EMAC mutual aid agreement, Idaho personnel are paid for their time and service by the requesting state.