Me Too

Different Idaho demographic groups are not too far apart in their beliefs about sexual harassment in the workforce – whether the #MeToo movement has impacted that problem, a recent Idaho Politics Weekly poll shows.

But they do have real differences on whether the #MeToo movement has gone too far, its impact is about right, or whether the effort has not gone far enough, the Dan Jones & Associates survey finds.

Overall:

-- 26 percent say sexual harassment in the workplace has lessened because of the #MeToo movement.

-- 45 percent said it has stayed about the same.

-- 13 percent say sexual harassment has actually gotten worse because of the #MeToo movement.

-- And 17 percent don’t know.

Those numbers stay around the same as different demographics and partisan attitudes are broken out.

But when DJA asks if the movement has gone too far, is about right, or not far enough, now we see some real differences.

Among all Idahoans:

-- 46 percent the #MeToo movement has gone too far.

-- 28 percent said it is about right.

-- 12 percent say it has not gone far enough.

-- And 13 percent don’t know.

But when you ask men about the movement, 51 percent say it has gone too far.

And when you ask women, only 42 percent say it has gone too far.

-- 25 percent of men say the #MeToo movement is about right, but 31 percent of women say it is about right.

-- And 14 percent of women say it has not gone far enough, while only 10 percent of men agree.

And look at this difference between young adult Idahoans and those their parents’ age:

-- 39 percent of young Idahoans, 18-29, say the #MeToo movement has gone too far.

-- But 53 percent of those 50-59 say it’s too far.

And partisan feelings really separate on this question:

-- 67 percent of Republicans say the movement has gone too far.

-- But only 14 percent of Democrats agree.

-- And 40 percent of political independents say the movement has gone too far.

-- Only 4 percent of Republicans say the movement has not gone far enough.

-- While 25 percent of Democrats say it needs to go further in its societal impact.

DJA polled 615 adults from Jan. 23 to Feb. 4. The survey has a margin of error of plus or minus 4 percent.