Nearly three-fourths of Idahoans say climate change is a threat to the world, but they differ on how serious it is, a new Idaho Politics Weekly poll finds.

Pollster Dan Jones & Associates polled 615 voters, and the results from earlier this month show:

-- 40 percent said climate change is a threat, but “one that can be managed.”

-- 33 percent said it “is one of the greatest threats facing the world.”

-- 24 percent said climate change “is not a threat at all.”

-- And 2 percent didn’t know.

Men are less concerned with climate change than are women – only 27 percent of men said it is one of the greatest threats to the world, while 39 percent of women believe it so.

And it’s clear that the issue of climate change has become political:

-- Only 9 percent of Republicans say it is one of the greatest threats we face.

-- 47 percent of Republicans say it’s a threat, but we can manage it. (Or 56 percent of the GOP say it is a threat of some kind.)

-- And 42 percent of Republicans say climate change is no threat at all.

-- But Democrats see climate change very differently; 72 percent said it is a great threat, 23 percent say it is manageable, or 95 percent see climate change is a problem of some kind.

-- Only 4 percent of Democrats say it is not a threat at all.

-- 43 percent of political independents say climate change is one of our greatest threats, 40 percent it can be managed (83 percent seeing it as a threat of some kind), while 13 percent say it is no threat at all.

And there is a real difference on climate change depending on how educated you are:

-- Those with just a high school degree, 29 percent see it as a great threat, 44 percent say it is manageable, or 73 percent saying it is a threat of some kind.

-- But 48 percent – almost half – of all Idahoans who have an advanced college degree, like a PhD or lawyer or CPA, say climate change is one of the greatest threats the world faces.

-- 35 percent say it is a manageable threat, so 83 percent believe it is a problem of some kind.

DJA polled 615 adults from Jan. 23 to Feb. 4. The survey has a margin of error of plus or minus 4 percent.