By a slight plurality, most Idahoans believe the United States is on the wrong track, but more than half say Idaho itself is going the right way, a new Idaho Politics Weekly poll shows.

The survey was taken just after President Donald Trump won the office, and does no reflect views about the first three weeks of the Trump administration.

In both instances, whether thinking about the nation or the State of Idaho, more Republicans are optimistic about what’s happening than do Democrats or political independents, finds IPW pollster Dan Jones & Associates.

The numbers:

  • 48 percent of Idahoans say the U.S. is on the wrong track.

  • 38 percent believe the nation is going in the right direction

  • And 14 percent don’t know.

  • Locally, 54 percent say Idaho itself is going in the right direction.

  • 29 percent the state is on the wrong track.

  • And 17 percent don’t have an opinion. That is a rather high “don’t know,” considering the question is a simple one.

Of course, the respondents knew that Republican Trump was headed for the White House and that both houses of Congress would be controlled by Republicans.

So there is a heavy weight of partisanship in the political breakouts.

Jones finds:

  • Idaho Republicans say the nation is going in the right direction after the election, 50-38 percent.

  • Democrats feel just opposite, the country is going in the wrong direction, 62-24 percent.

  • Independents also believe the country is going in the wrong direction, 56-31 percent.

  • Those of another political party – mostly conservative in Idaho – also believe the country is going in the wrong direction, 43-39 percent.

The feelings are even more exaggerated when asked if Idaho was going in the right or wrong direction:

  • Republicans say right direction, 78-8 percent.

  • Democrats say wrong direction, 66-24 percent

  • Independents swing to right direction when asked how the state is doing, 50-32 percent.

  • And those of other political parties are split, 40 percent say right direction, 31 percent say the wrong direction.

Idaho women don’t much like Trump; men do. And who the president is has a lot to do with one’s feelings about how the country is doing.

Jones finds a real difference between the sexes on this right/wrong direction question:

  • Nationally, only 32 percent of women believe the country is going in the right direction, while 42 percent of the men do.

  • 54 percent of women said it is going in the wrong direction, only 42 percent of men agree.

Republicans have been running Idaho for a generation or more. But women are more unsure of how the state is doing.

  • 60 percent of men said Idaho is going in the right direction, only 49 percent of women agree.

  • 28 percent of men say the state is going the wrong way, 30 percent of women agree.

Jones polled 607 adults from Nov. 18-29. The survey has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.98 percent.